ENTERPRISE JAVABEANS 3.0 5TH EDITION PDF

Get Enterprise JavaBeans 3. This chapter explores the core of the EJB and Java Persistence architectures: how enterprise beans are distributed as business objects and how they interact with Java Persistence. Chapter 3 explores the services and resource-management techniques supported by EJB. In order to be truly versatile, the EJB component design had to be smart.

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Get Enterprise JavaBeans 3. It is an enterprise infrastructure designed to provide developers with the automatic management of many of the services essential to enterprise applications. The EJB container—the immediate environment of enterprise bean components and the provider of managed services to them—is at the center of this architecture. Consequently, EJB development was unnecessarily complex.

For example: Implementation of various EJB interfaces led to a lot of boilerplate code for methods that were required by the interface, but not needed by the application. An XML deployment descriptor was required to integrate the application with its environment and with container services. The design of container-managed persistence made domain object modeling unnecessarily complex and heavyweight. While container-managed persistence was originally conceived as an ease-of-use facility, in practice, it was awkward and limiting.

The purpose of the EJB 3. One of the first steps in this process was evaluating the sources of complexity in the earlier EJB releases. This involved examining criticisms of EJB; understanding which EJB design patterns were really antipatterns; identifying APIs that were clumsy to use, were nonintuitive to newcomers to the technology, or could be dispensed with entirely; and recognizing other aspects of the technology that were obstacles to ease of use.

The preliminary list of what needed to be fixed together with a proposal for how the task could be approached formed the basis of JSR , the Java Community Process specification request with which I launched EJB 3.

Bill Burke, the chief architect of the JBoss application server and author of this book, was one of the key participants in this effort. The XML deployment descriptor has become unnecessary, except for addressing more advanced cases. The Java language metadata facility, newly added to Java SE, aided us in making these simplifications. EJB 3. Further, EJB 3. By using metadata annotations to designate environment dependencies and life cycle callbacks, EJB 3. A bean class can now selectively specify what it needs, and can implement only needed methods rather than unnecessary boilerplate code.

We were able to eliminate the earlier EJBHome factory patterns as well by requiring smarter interpositioning on the part of the container transparently to the application in creating references to components and their instances at the time of lookup or injection. Session beans can now be programmed as ordinary Java classes with ordinary business interfaces, rather than as heavyweight components. These and other changes have greatly simplified the developer view. The simplification of container-managed persistence provided a greater challenge.

We began the effort here with the same steps as the simplification of session beans and message-driven beans: elimination of unneeded interfaces, use of annotations for configuration information, and so on. It soon became clear, however, that EJB persistence needed a more radical transformation. Persistent entities are now instances of ordinary but managed Java classes.

As such, they can be created with new and passed to other application tiers as ordinary Java objects. In this new edition of Enterprise JavaBeans, based on the earlier work by Richard Monson-Haefel, Bill Burke shares these insights together with his in-depth perspective on how these new, simplified EJB 3.

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Free Book: Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans 3.0, Fourth Edition

Get Enterprise JavaBeans 3. It is an enterprise infrastructure designed to provide developers with the automatic management of many of the services essential to enterprise applications. The EJB container—the immediate environment of enterprise bean components and the provider of managed services to them—is at the center of this architecture. Consequently, EJB development was unnecessarily complex. For example: Implementation of various EJB interfaces led to a lot of boilerplate code for methods that were required by the interface, but not needed by the application. An XML deployment descriptor was required to integrate the application with its environment and with container services.

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ENTERPRISE JAVABEANS 3.0 5TH EDITION PDF

Faubar For your information, that list is here, jboss-ejb3. Account Options Sign in. In fact, EJB 3. Multitable Mappings Exercise 6. Similar Threads This fifth edition, written by Bill Burke and Richard Monson-Haefel, has been updated to capture the very latest need-to-know Java technologies in the same award-winning fashion that drove the success of the previous four strong-selling editions.

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